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What's yours is mine, what's mine is mine own

Bw Crying Girl

Try to take a teddy bear from a toddler and you will learn at first hand what ownership means to people. Ownership is clearly important to us all; but most distributed architectures fail to learn the lesson; most DC architectures assume that there is “someone in charge”, who implicitly own everything.

The SIC assumption is clearly not true for the Internet. I personally think that it is not all that true even within a single corporation. (Try to get a sales person to give you their Rolodex; toddlers are no competition.)

This, for me, is the true reason to be excited about Service Oriented Architecture. Finally, we are beginning to understand that a computer architecture that respects people's desire to maintain ownership is clearly more likely to be functional than one that does not.

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