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What's yours is mine, what's mine is mine own

Bw Crying Girl

Try to take a teddy bear from a toddler and you will learn at first hand what ownership means to people. Ownership is clearly important to us all; but most distributed architectures fail to learn the lesson; most DC architectures assume that there is “someone in charge”, who implicitly own everything.

The SIC assumption is clearly not true for the Internet. I personally think that it is not all that true even within a single corporation. (Try to get a sales person to give you their Rolodex; toddlers are no competition.)

This, for me, is the true reason to be excited about Service Oriented Architecture. Finally, we are beginning to understand that a computer architecture that respects people's desire to maintain ownership is clearly more likely to be functional than one that does not.

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Existential Types are the flip side of generics

Generic types, as can now be seen in all the major programming languages have a flip side that has yet to be widely appreciated: existential types.

Variables whose types are generic may not be modified within a generic function (or class): they can be kept in variables, they can be passed to other functions (provided they too have been supplied to the generic function), but other than that they are opaque. Again, when a generic function (or class) is used, then the actual type binding for the generic must be provided – although that type may also be generic, in which case the enclosing entity must also be generic.

Existential types are often motivated by modules. A module can be seen to be equivalent to a record with its included functions: except that modules also typically encapsulate types too. Abstract data types are a closely related topic that also naturally connect to existential types (there is an old but still very relevant and readable article on the topic Abstract types have …

Concept Oriented Markup

I have long been frustrated with all the different text mark up languages and word processors that I have used. There are many reasons for this; but the biggest issue is that markups (including very powerful ones like TeX) are not targeted at the kind of stuff I write.

Nowadays, it seems archaic to still be thinking in terms of sections and chapters. The world is linked and that applies to the kind of technical writing that I do.

I believe that the issue is fundamental. A concept like "section" is inherently about the structure of a document. But, what I want to focus on are concepts like "example", "definition", and "function type".

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Hook, Line and Sinker

It is well documented that people’s #1 fear is speaking in public! Effective and efficient public speaking is a whole topic in its own right; but a few simple tips might help to both improve your effectiveness and help to reduce the anxiety.

You may be called on to talk about your work at very short notice; or you may have a week’s notice; and you may be required to give a formal slide show or just a brief verbal update. Many, if not most of the issues, are the same.
The Hook
Newspaper editors call the first paragraph of an article ‘the hook’. Its meant to hook you into reading the rest of the piece. On the other hand, the classical ‘say what you are going to say, say it, and say what you said’ approach gives people plenty of time to switch off.

The hook may be playful, it may be controversial, but it must communicate why the listener should pay attention.
The Line
Its a conversation! Even if no one says anything they are listening and thinking; and maybe replying to you in their head. So, …